A new Internet brand is now available that is taking over old ones or at least they are old when it comes to Internet. AOL and Yahoo are now part of Oath that is owned by Verizon and the new brand has sparked a number of jokes on Twitter and other social media sites.

One tweet mentioned that is sounded like Oaf, while another said Oof may already have been taken. However, with over one billion customers, the new combination has solid potential.

AOL CEO Tim Armstrong, who will soon be the CEO at Oath, said consumers are not going to hear the name Oath that often.

The brand is one that will remain behind the scenes said Armstrong. The real brands being promoted will be one such as Yahoo, Yahoo Sports, Yahoo Finances, Huffington Post and TechCrunch.

Oath, the new umbrella under which AOL and Yahoo will be positioned, is the result of the $4.5 billion acquisition by Verizon of Yahoo, which will merge with AOL. Armstrong said Yahoo products’ users can keep using them, but will likely see more cross-promotions of brands and content that is Verizon owned.

Yahoo has not succeeded in increasing popularity in its product to produce large money-makers. That will be changed under Verizon and specifically under Oath.

One analyst in the Internet industry said that combining the customer data from AOL, Yahoo and Verizon could make it even more appealing to the advertiser.

The overall subscriber base could give Verizon a position of third largest player in the sector of targeted advertising behind only Google and Facebook, said an IT research company. The analyst added that Verizon’s rebranding was not any different than when Alphabet became the parent company of Google.

Congress eased the privacy regulations for Internet which allows Verizon to share and to profit from a great deal of information that it receives about users of Yahoo. However, that is good and bad, says on analyst because revelations about security breaches at Yahoo have already caused unease amongst consumers.

Users will be seeing changes in the approach the companies have with their privacy. They might need to change passwords on a more frequent basis, and more levels of security could be added.

The breaches at Yahoo were under Marissa Mayer the current CEO who has been at the helm for close to four years. Much speculation has circulated about what Mayer’s future is with the company, but Armstrong would only say that the new team of executives would be announced in late June.

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